Steroids Testing vs Budget Cuts

by Will Curl on April 22, 2011

steroids testing vs budget cutsSince 2008 the State of Texas has been randomly administering steroid tests to High School Athletes.  The latest results from last fall showed that over 2000 had been tested out of 135 schools and that only one person tested positive for the drug.  The report also states that one person did not appear to take his test as ordered.

Here is some more about the subject:

The latest round of Texas high school steroids tests caught just one student taking performance enhancing drugs.

The University Interscholastic League on Thursday announced results of tests conducted last fall. Out of 2,083 tests at 135 schools, one student tested positive for steroids.

Athletes are chosen at random, and the UIL said one student failed to show up for a test. The most tested sports were football for boys and soccer for girls.

State lawmakers are debating whether to continue the 4-year-old program that has been cut back in recent years because of budget problems.

Texas has conducted more than 50,000 tests with less than 30 confirmed cases of steroid use.

The results from these tests are obviously encouraging.  One can only hope that if High Schools can monitor steroids use closely that colleges and universities will do the same.  Of course this does not mean that the chosen ones who make it to professional sports won’t consider steroids to succeed in the sporting business where only results maintain your status.

The concern at the High School level is that many states, like the state of Texas, are confront with suspending testing for steroids because of budget cuts.  If steroids testing is the first program to be cut at every budget meeting then we are telling our children that we are not that concerned about the steroids issue.

What we don’t want to do is send the wrong signals to our High School athletes.  I am sure we can find wasteful spending in High Schools and cut it out; but steroids testing is not one of them.

For more information visit:

http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/ap/tx/7531987.html

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